Category: Families, friends & carers

The impact of sexual assault

The impact of sexual assault is determined by many factors and each survivor reacts to the experience in her or his unique way. There is no right or wrong way to feel and no set time for when you should be feeling better. However, there are some common responses reported by survivors in terms of the impact of being sexually assaulted. These include the impact on physical, emotional and psychological health as well as on behaviour and social relationships.

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What are the myths and facts about sexual assault?

This entry is part 2 of 2 in the topic Myths about sexual assault

There are a number of commonly held myths about sexual assault.

Unfortunately, these are prevalent in all areas of society, from the victims/survivors themselves through to the police and the judiciary. It is important to explode these myths and set out the real facts.

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What happens when you contact a Centre Against Sexual Assault?

There are 15 CASAs throughout Victoria, including the Victorian Sexual Assault Crisis Line (after hours telephone service 1800 806 292).

CASAs work to ensure that women, children and men who are victim/survivors of sexual assault have access to comprehensive, timely support and intervention to address their needs. CASAs also work towards the elimination of sexual violence through community and professional education, informing government policy, advocating for law reform and facilitating research to increase community understanding of the nature and incidence of sexual assault.

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What if my friend has been sexually assaulted?

If you have a friend who tells you that they have been sexually assaulted, then the first step towards recovery has been taken. They have chosen a trusted person to confide in.

The way you respond to their confidence is very important. You will have feelings of your own to deal with. You may be upset and confused. Because of the emotional stress of listening to what they are telling you, you may feel like crying or giggling. You may not feel competent to support your friend in what they are going through, and you may not know where to turn for information that will help them.

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